Web of broken promises leaves us with dud internet

SECOND BEST: Cr Paul Tully has lamented the poor internet service that afflicts parts of the city.
SECOND BEST: Cr Paul Tully has lamented the poor internet service that afflicts parts of the city. MICK TSIKAS

A LACK of ADSL2 connections in the eastern suburbs of Ipswich is a concern for residents and businesses.

The issue of National Broadband Network (NBN) services in Ipswich was raised by Cr Paul Tully at a recent council meeting.

After the meeting Cr Tully said there were very few ADSL2 connections available for new people moving into the eastern suburbs. Cr Tully said the current rollout is a second rate rollout compared to what was initially a high speed rollout across the nation. He said speeds had dropped by 75 per cent and had changed from fibre to the premises to fibre to the node after the Coalition announced the change in the wake of the last federal election.

"The current government said they were doing it to save money but in the meantime there has been a cost blowout," he said.

"We are going to end up with a second rate internet service across Australia. Sure, some of the areas like Goodna, Bellbird Park, Redbank Plains and parts of Collingwood Park have a good NBN but that is fibre to the premises and very high speed.

"But when you look at countries like India, England, the US and New Zealand we are ending up with a second rate service. In the Springfield region we are still waiting for the rollout to recommence after it stopped three years ago."

The design work had been done but then the NBN came to a complete halt, he said.

"The other problem is that a lot of people in that area are connected to the Goodna exchange which has very few ADSL2 ports available," Cr Tully added.

"People are moving in and relying on wireless connections for the internet and for business, schools, community organisations and people in their homes it is hopeless. It beggars belief that the NBN, which was showing great promise of being rolled out across the city, came to a halt the day after the last election.

"Then there was the change we are all familiar with - that instead of being fibre to the premises it is going to be fibre to the node with the old copper wires the last connection between the node and the household premises.

"This is unfortunate that parts of Ipswich will have very high speed connections to individual premises and that others won't."

Cr Tully drew attention to some statements made in this election campaign.

"For anyone watching (last week's) Q and A Liberal front bencher Christopher Pyne said Australians do not need the super fast speeds promised when Labor wanted to roll out the NBN," he said during the council meeting.

"I don't know where he gets that from."

Mayor Paul Pisasale interjected at this point and said "the only people that say that are those who already have it".

Cr Tully said the original roll-out of 100 megabytes per second had been changed to 25 megabytes per second.

"Christopher Pyne was asked if the government rejected its policy of downgrading the speed," Cr Tully continued.

"He said 'absolutely not and there has not been a delay of the NBN'.

"But if you speak to the people in Ipswich's eastern suburbs in Springfield, Camira, Springfield Lakes, Springfield Central, Augustine Heights and Brookwater it has been an absolute shambles. Parts of the city are the have and parts are the have nots. I know there has been some movement in the reaches of the city but we have to stand up and say that this is not good enough.

"I just hope that any future government, of either political persuasion, realise that while they might get quicker rollout with fibre to the node that ultimately they will need to replace the copper wire connections. Some of them are old and very poor quality and that will degrade the signal from the node to the individual premises."

Cr Tully said the comments of Mr Pyne would be front and centre when voters with poor or no NBN vote on July 2.

Topics:  adsl internet nbn

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